Unnatural Urge To Kill; Desire to kill Takes Over Japanese Student As He Stabs A Child.

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The police in the Japanese prefecture of Aomori have arrested a 14-year-old boy for slitting a sixth-grade child’s throat. The incident took place on Tuesday afternoon in the city of Hachinohe.

Unnatural urge to kill;

Both the city and prefecture are in the north of Honshu, the main island in Japan. Police have made a statement that the boy intended to kill the girl in what seemed was a random attack. Both the assaulter and the young victim were strangers. They did not know each other, according to authorities.

The boy told police investigators that It didn’t matter who the victim was, The assaulter just wanted to kill. It was an unnatural desire to kill irrelevant of the circumstances.

Luckily, the girl has survived the attack. She will require around three weeks of medical care to recover from the deep wound to her throat from the assault. Police have claimed that they have seized the weapon used in the attack. Additionally, other knives from the boy’s home were taken too.

Japanese System at blame;

Police investigators are attempting to find the specific motive for the attack. However, a larger question poses here. The bigger problem stands as to how this could have even happened in the first place. A partial explanation has been found. An article in June 2004 published by the Irish Times and written by David McNeill has been blamed. The report titled “The Child Killings That Have Shocked Japan” is taken to be at fault.

The article says that Japanese kids are victims of a system that worked for parents, It is now breaking down, Osamu Mizutani has said this, He is an author of a best-selling book about Japan’s fallen youth. He says that it is no right to be just blaming parents. Japan has to look at the bigger picture.

The article by McNeill’s article also references a book written by John Nathan. The book is titled “Japan Unbound”. He writes, “Japan is now paying the price for decades of sacrificing trust and intimacy and personal realisation to efficiency and economic growth.”
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